Noteworthy Entries

Following is a list of some of the more noteworthy entries on Mike Industries:

  • How To Snatch an Expiring Domain — I’m not sure why, but this article has received tens of thousands of views and continues to get a lot of traffic. It’s an inside look at the domain expiration process.
  • How to Win Friends and Influence Art Directors — If you’re just breaking into the design business, you may have a lot of questions as to what is important and how to get started. This article is a quick primer on best practices.
  • How to Properly Apply for a Design Position — So many people get this wrong. If you’re going after a design job, this is how to present yourself.
  • Unstealth! Get Ready for Newsvine — The inaugural blog post, unveiling Newsvine in 2005. Our company was acquired two years to the day after founding it, by NBC News.
  • DevEdge: The ESPN.com standards-based redesign — In redesigning ESPN.com with web standards, we became the first major media site to drop tables, font tags, and other outdated code in favor of CSS and other best practices. It was a controversial move at the time, dropping support for older browsers and concentrating on new technology, but it has paid off in droves.
  • The Design Authority: Producing a Reaction Through Design — Working on the web doesn’t have to mean abandoning print. Element K Magazine examines this designer’s origins in the analog world and how they still serve as an influence in current work.
  • Make Your Site Mobile-Friendly in Two Minutes — A technique for making a freestanding mobile version of your web site with only a few lines of PHP.
  • sIFR 2.0 — The official release of sIFR 2.0, a typographic technique I co-invented. In use on such sites as ABCNews, MSNBC, AT&T, Nike, and The U.S. Navy.
  • Can We Speed Up Browser Evolution? — An in-depth look at why web standards take so long to evolve and what we can do to help speed the progress.
  • A Good Problem to Have — A look back at Apple’s past, its rise to power, and how lucky we are that things turned out the way they did.
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Steve Jobs speaks about the future at the International Design Conference in 1983:

31 years later, it’s safe to say this is one of the most prescient speeches about technology ever delivered. Jobs covers wireless networking, tablets, Google StreetView, Siri, and the App Store (among other things) many years before their proliferation. A fantastic listen.

How to travel around the world for a year:

Great advice for when you finally find the time.

LiveSurface:

A fantastic app for prototyping your design work onto real world objects like billboards, book covers, and coffee cups. This seems like just as great of a tool for people learning design as it does for experts.

50 problems in 50 days:

One man’s attempt to solve 50 problems in 50 days using only great design. Some good startup ideas in here…

How to Do Philosophy:

If you’ve ever suspected that most classical philosophy is a colossal waste of time, Paul Graham tells you why you’re probably right.

TIME: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us:

Stephen Brill follows the money to uncover the pinnacle of corruption that is the U.S. Health Care system. A must-read article if there ever was one.

DIY Dot Org:

A beautifully designed site full of fun and challenging DIY projects. I could spend months on here.

The Steve Jobs Video Archive:

A collection of over 250 Steve Jobs videos in biographical order

Self-portraits from an artist under the influence of 48 different psychoactive drug combos.

Water Wigs are pretty amazing.

David Pogue proposes to his girlfriend by creating a fake movie trailer about them and then getting a theater to play it before a real movie. Beautiful and totally awesome.

Jonah Peretti's letter to BuzzFeed’s employees:

If you’re wondering what a excellent blueprint for a modern media company looks like, look no further than Buzzfeed CEO Jonah Peretti’s latest email to his employees. In it, Peretti explains a lot of his company’s virtues, the most important being a relentless focus on always providing what’s best for the user. Vox Media (operators of The Verge) is the only other company I can think of which approaches this level of reform and execution.

The Covers Project:

I love this so much: a cross-referenceable database of cover songs, searchable by song or artist. Slowed down, acoustic covers — no matter the song — are so enjoyable to me that I wish it was a requirement to play one at every show. If you like them as much as I do, make sure to check out M. Ward’s Let’s Dance or Sun Kil Moon’s entire album of Modest Mouse covers.

“More and more people in this country no longer make or do anything tangible; if your job wasn’t performed by a cat or a boa constrictor in a Richard Scarry book I’m not sure I believe it’s necessary. I can’t help but wonder whether all this histrionic exhaustion isn’t a way of covering up the fact that most of what we do doesn’t matter.”
- Tim Kreider’s denunciation of the cult of busyness is excellent. (via jimray)
The iPhone and Disruption: Five Years In:

Take your pick of about 20 great quotes from this Daring Fireball article. My personal favorite:

The iPhone is not and never was a phone. It is a pocket-sized computer that obviates the phone. The iPhone is to cell phones what the Mac was to typewriters.