A good problem to have

Through much of the late 90s and early 00s, I remember having the same conversation over and over again about Apple and Microsoft. I had it with my friends, I had it with my colleagues, and I had it with anyone else who was interested in computers. It went something like this:

Other person: “When are you going to give up already and start using a PC? The war is over. Apple lost.”

Me: “They still make the best stuff and I want to support the company that makes the best stuff; not a company that uses their monopoly to sell products.”

Other person: “Don’t you think Apple would do the same thing if they were in charge?”

Me: “Yes. They’d probably be even more ruthless, but at least they’d make great products.”

From there, the conversation would tail off in another direction but I always remember thinking wishfully to myself that if Apple ever did rule the world again, what a fantastic problem it would be. Instead of having our future dictated to us by a company who didn’t even care enough to fix a broken web browser for over five years, we’d have our future dictated to us by a company who produced the most wonderful products in the world. The dream seemed so far-fetched, however, that it was easy to miss the potential for nightmare in it.

Trading places

Apple will probably finish this year a larger company than Microsoft, from a market capitalization perspective. That would mean the world values the sum of future cashflows into Apple more than any company in the United States besides Exxon-Mobil. God forbid the terrible BP oil disaster gets worse and has cascading effects on other oil companies, we could see Apple at #1.

So in a sense, we’ve now admitted — as investors at least — that Apple owns our wallets, many years into the future. This actually feels good right now, though, in a way. Not only am I using a great operating system, but lots of other people are too. Not only do I have a phone that keeps me connected, but I really enjoy using it too. Not only can I craft richly designed web experiences for geeks with good browsers but a good majority of people can finally view them too.

Most things are great so far. The reward we’ve reaped as a society for shoving greenbacks into Apple’s bank account for the last decade is that we have much better stuff now. It’s the exact opposite effect we got from making Microsoft big.

Those who are following the situation, however, have noticed a few things change recently, the most obvious being a move towards an incredibly closed operating system in iPhones and iPads. Many believe it’s only a matter of time before most of Apple’s products run on a similar OS. There are many definitions of “closed” vs. “open” but here is mine:

A closed system is one where a single organization has absolute control of everything that goes into it and everything that comes out of it.

Adobe ignores fire, gets burned

Steve Jobs wrote in his mostly reasonable letter condemning Flash that it was Adobe whose stuff was closed and Apple was the one using open technologies, but Adobe’s CEO — despite saying very little of substance — was right about one thing: this is a smokescreen. In order to use the Flash format, all I need to do is either buy a single copy of it (if the IDE is useful to me), or use any number of other, free compilers out there. In other words, Adobe never even needs to know about me and never needs to approve what I’m doing or selling.

In order to get my stuff onto an iPad or iPhone, however, I must receive explicit approval by a human being working for Apple after this human being has manually reviewed my work, derived my intentions for the product, and made a value judgement on what my creation brings to the device. As long as that process exists, there shall be no arguments that the iPhone or iPad are more open than just about anything we’ve ever seen before… including Flash. To claim that because Apple is pushing open standards like HTML5 (really for their own benefit) means they are somehow more open than Adobe is folly.

Adobe’s problem in this mess is that they’ve painted themselves into a corner with the public. They used to be loved by everyone who used their products. Ask a designer ten years ago whether they’d rather switch away from Apple or switch away from Adobe and I’m sure most would have stuck with Adobe. Today, not only has the situation reversed itself, but I find myself actively trying to move away from Adobe on my own. They’ve shipped nothing but bloatware for the past five years, each version of CS being slower and buggier than the previous and offering very little important utility in return. $700-$1000 for Photoshop CS5 and it still can’t even print a tiled document. Adobe Creative Suite, in many ways, has become the Microsoft Office for the creative design and development industry. Somehow I bet that was a company goal in a presentation at some point. Mission accomplished. So when Apple stiffarms Adobe by changing section 3.3.1 of their iPhone OS developer agreement, it’s no wonder people aren’t exactly rushing to Adobe’s defense.

Flash has taken a slightly different path towards public distaste and I actually don’t blame Adobe for most of it. When Flash first came out, only the most talented design visionaries used it. When a new Flash site came out in 1999, each one was like a new DaVinci… beautiful works of art that moved the web from a tame, ugly typographically poor medium to a center stage for creativity.

Then the advertisers got ahold of it.

When most people speak ill of Flash, they are actually speaking ill of ads. Watching Flash video on YouTube doesn’t crash your browser; visiting a news site with five annoying Flash ads all trying to synchronize with each other does.

What most of these people don’t realize, though, is that it’s other “open” technologies that play a part in making this happen and will continue to, long after Flash is history. The OBJECT tag which spawns Flash movies is an open standard. The javascript that popped open that window with the screaming Flash ad is an open standard. And the HTML/CSS that slowly sashayed that 300×250 div right the fuck over that paragraph you were trying to read is an open standard too.

When Flash is gone, this overly aggressive marketing will simply be foisted upon you using more “open” technologies like HTML5. And guess what? It’ll be harder to block because it looks more like content than Flash does.

Here is when I digress just a little bit…

It also amuses me when people talk about two things in particular with regard to the iPhone and iPad. First, how much better some companies’ iPhone apps are than their web sites, as if the company is somehow so much more gifted at creating iPhone apps than web pages. It feels better because it’s designed for you to do things quickly. Most web sites are actually not designed for speed of task completion at all. They are designed to maximize page views or at the very least, time on site (and hence, maximize revenue). ESPN.com doesn’t want you reading one story about the Mayweather/Mosley fight and then moving on with your day. They want you to read ten more stories after that, check your fantasy teams, and buy a Seahawks jersey. Mobile.espn.com, on the other hand, is more concerned with getting you in and out quickly because they know you have less tolerance for distraction and extraneous clicks when you’re on your phone. The second thing is when people talk about how great content looks in some of these iPad apps. Again, this is a reaction to the lack of distraction, not the tablet form factor.

Content that is free of distractions and potential crashes looks and feels better. Period. It’s not the hardware; it’s the environment.

… and then try boldly to pull it back in

… which brings us back to Apple and their role in the way we experience information moving forward.

With the iPhone and the iPad, Apple has either smartly or stupidly drawn a line in the sand and declared themselves no longer just the arbiters of hardware and system UI but arbiters of content and commerce as well. If you want to develop or produce content for Apple’s ecosystem, you will do exactly as Apple tells you to do. If you want to enjoy Apple’s products as a consumer, you’ll enjoy every freedom Apple provides and live with every limitation they impose. It’s like a country club. Apple isn’t saying you can’t play golf with your pit-stained t-shirt and denim cutoffs. They’re just saying you can’t do it at their club. Apple wants to run the most profitable country club in the world, with millions of members, but they don’t want everybody; and therein lies the difference between how their resurgence is playing out and how Microsoft’s dominance ultimately played out.

Microsoft wanted 100% share in every market they entered. The thought was that once you dominate a market, you can impose your will on it via pricing, distribution, bundling, and all sorts of other methods designed to maximize profit. To Microsoft in the 1980s, a monopoly was a great problem to aspire to have, and since antitrust laws weren’t routinely applied to software companies, the threat seemed immaterial. The problem with this thinking, however, was that the law eventually caught up to them and crippled their ability to continue operating as a monopoly.

Apple, on the other hand — while in danger of eventually suffering the same fate — seems determined to avoid it. What’s the best way to avoid becoming a monopoly? Make sure you never get close to 100% market share. What’s the best way to temper your market share? Keep prices a bit higher than you could. Keep supply a bit lower than you could. Keep investing in high margin differentiation and not low margin ubiquity. Remember how Microsoft invested $150 million in Apple in 1997 in order to keep them around as a plausible “OS alternative” in hopes of avoiding the antitrust knife? Well Apple already has that in Android, in Blackberry, in Windows Mobile, in Palm, and in Nokia. They are fighting hard right now to make sure they are one of the two or three that will continue to be relevant in 5-10 years, but their goal is clearly not to be at 100% or even 90%. That level of success would get the company trustbusted.

It is this prescient and necessarily restrained motivation that reveals the true reason why Apple has closed up tighter over the last few years: it’s not to take control of the world. It’s specifically to separate themselves from a pack of companies they need as their competitors but want relegated to the lower margin areas of the market. Apple will stay closed as long as being closed is a net positive to their business. Until people either start abandoning their products because of this or the do the opposite and adopt their products at a rate which creates a monopoly, they will continue operating at their current clip: high innovation, high profits, and high control.

It’s scary to people because they remember the harm other companies have done when they reached monopoly status, but with Google, Microsoft, Nokia, RIMM, and now HP all keeping the market healthy with different alternatives, there is no excuse for not voting with your feet if you’re unhappy. Apple’s not going to take over the world because — if for no other reason — the laws of the United States won’t let them. If you don’t want to contribute to their success because their behavior is distasteful to you, then don’t; but don’t forget how fortunate we are to have such a ruthlessly innovative company at the helm of the ship at this point in time. Either get on it or just pick another boat and draft in its wake. When the biggest problem in personal technology is that the leading company is getting a little too exceptional, it’s a good problem to have.

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93 Responses:

  1. jz says:

    First, nice post, with a lot of good points. I would disagree with your final sentence, however. The biggest problem isn’t that the leading company is getting too exceptional, it’s that that company is acting in ways that should give people pause — such as censoring apps based on content (not just blatantly offensive stuff like porn but also other things such as satire of public figures). That Apple is putting out great products is nothing to fear; it’s what Apple is doing with the power it has garnered by building great products that should be cause for concern.

    Also, while Apple may never achieve a monopoly in terms of market share, I think it is possible for it to gain enough clout to control the mobile space as a monopoly would. Isn’t that why it’s such a big deal that Apple mobile devices don’t support Flash? Because one company in the mobile devices field refuses to support _____ (fill in the blank with any technology, not just Flash), it can severely cripple, if not flat-out kill, that technology’s future in mobile computing, even as other mobile device makers are trying to make it work. That sounds close enough to a monopoly to worry me. Of course, the only way to fix that situation is for other companies to get their act together and provide legitimate competition. Until then, Apple is going to do what’s best for Apple, and rightly so.

  2. paul in kirkland says:

    I’ve always felt that if you were able to guarantee Steve Jobs that he could either have all of the market or all of the control, he’d take all of the control 100% of the time.

    I think the fact that Apple isn’t a monopoly is a conscious business decision, and one they actively manage, so they can maintain control of their ecosystem.

  3. eddy says:

    What I read is a lot of entitlement.

    I was there in the early nineties when Apple went to their developers to explain what they could do to help Apple move to an OS that offered preempting multitasking and protected memory. Apple employees got shout at and even cursed. Every developer in the room then seemed to feel that the effort was entirely Apple’s burden. They wanted Apple to come up with a solution that was 100% backward compatible.

    Apple learned then that it is all about the API. Carbon offered abstraction from the direct memory access and private calls. Only those who moved to Carbon could move to OSX.

    What I see Apple doing now is protect against a situation where whiny developers can’t move forward anymore and stall the platform. Giving in brought Apple to the brink of extinction once. I hope that won’t happen again.

  4. Really well-written piece, Mike. Two points I’d like to make, one having been made by others here is that the very existence of an HTML5 browser that isn’t crippled to prevent geo-location or local storage defies the idea that Apple controls all that goes in or out of the iPhone OS experience.

    Second is what Flash has done that has driven me away from it, which is the perpetuation of non-standard UI elements. Scroll bars, especially, but other elements don’t behave the way they do in the browser, and while Flash does bring certain advantages, it robs so much of the consistent experience a browser can give that I ended up avoiding Flash-based content altogether. That, along with the workout it gives my Macbook fans, drives me bananas and has me rooting for its death.

    Thanks again for a forward-thinking article.

  5. Watts says:

    @mykola: My suspicion, from reading your comments, is that no matter where the focus of RIAs may lie two years from now, you’ll be there. You seem pretty clear-eyed on the subject.

    (I’m kind of agnostic on it, personally; I think Flash has a lot of potential it doesn’t often get credit for, but that’s because it’s potential which mostly goes unused. It seems to me that a future where HTML5 and (hopefully) Javascript engines based on the recently-finalized ECMAScript Edition are commonplace, though, is a future where ActionScript and the Flash runtime is fairly superfluous.)

  6. […] From there, the conversation would tail off in another direction but I always remember thinking wishfully to myself that if Apple ever did rule the world again, what a fantastic problem it would be. Instead of having our future dictated to us by a company who didn’t even care enough to fix a broken web browser for over five years, we’d have our future dictated to us by a company who produced the most wonderful products in the world. The dream seemed so far-fetched, however, that it was easy to miss the potential for nightmare in it. via mikeindustries.com […]

  7. Justin says:

    You said:

    “In order to get my stuff onto an iPad or iPhone, however, I must receive explicit approval by a human being working for Apple after this human being has manually reviewed my work, derived my intentions for the product, and made a value judgement on what my creation brings to the device.”

    This is false, unless “your stuff” is impossible to accomplish in Mobile Safari, and it makes you look ridiculous to claim that it’s true.

  8. Well said sir, well said.

    This reminded me of the time when we were out and a friend of yours, who I believe worked at Microsoft was giving you shit about Apple. He was saying something about how you were just following Steve Jobs taste and didn’t have any taste of your own. Your response was basically, well as long as he’s got good taste, I don’t see why I wouldn’t use his products.

  9. […] An interesting blog post I found via Gruber’s blog. […]

  10. Hamranhansenhansen says:

    > In order to get my stuff onto an iPad
    > or iPhone, however, I must receive
    > explicit approval by a human being
    > working for Apple

    Fundamentally untrue.

    You ignored the fact that this very Web page is running on iPads and iPhones right now, without any approval from Apple.

    You ignored that open apps go onto the open iPad and iPhone without any approval from Apple. These are apps written to the world’s open application programming interface, which can be written with any toolkit on any platform, deployed to iPhone OS from any server in the world, installed to local storage, appear on the user’s home screen with their other apps, and run in an open source application environment, without any approval from Apple. Apple has done as much as anyone to make this happen. All of the vapor promises of Flash with regards to cross-platform mobile development were all realized already with HTML5.

    You made the classic mistake of focusing on iTunes Store and forgetting that iTunes also features a music, movies, and book library that is completely independent of Apple. So all of these things are easily purchased or created yourself and then easily loaded onto an iPad or iPhone without any approval from Apple:

    * MP3/MP4 music downloads, or music CD’s, or music you create yourself, perhaps in the free GarageBand that came with your Mac

    * MP4 video downloads or movies you made yourself and may have edited in the free iMovie that came with your Mac

    * standard ePub eBooks, purchased from any bookstore, or again, books you made yourself

    Most of the storage on my iPad and my iPhone and my iPod is filled with bits that Apple did not approve of, and had no part in.

    There is absolutely *no reason* to use iTunes Store if you don’t want to. Everything can be put on there without it.

    > To claim that because Apple is pushing
    > open standards like HTML5 (really for
    > their own benefit) means they are somehow
    > more open than Adobe is folly.

    Again, fundamentally untrue. If Adobe open sourced FlashPlayer today they would still be 7 years behind Apple WebKit. WebKit is on every platform because Apple opened it. FlashPlayer is on Mac and PC and nowhere else because Adobe kept it closed.

    > If you want to develop or produce content
    > for Apple’s ecosystem, you will do exactly
    > as Apple tells you to do.

    No. If you want to develop or produce content for Apple’s *store*, you will do exactly as Apple tells you to do. Same as all stores. If you don’t want to, you sell open apps, open music, open movies, open books, and so on, in competing stores.

    The fact is: you can write an app, publish a song, publish a movie, publish a book, and they all run not only on iPad, iPhone, iPod, but also on *all* of the other devices. All the mobiles, all the personal computers.

    When it comes to native apps, yes iPhone apps are proprietary, but so are Android native apps and Windows native apps. You may not think approvals are good, but consumers and businesses (non-techie people) thinks approvals are really, really great. They are a feature for non-techies because they enable users to install their own apps without I-T support before, during, or afterwards. They get rid of the terribly unprofessional malware that plagues Windows and Android. And this creates a huge market for developers, since there are many more users than I-T. If developers have to walk on coals to enable consumers to have a safe, managed native app platform, the that is awesome.

    Consider that nothing gets into the Linux kernel that Linus Torvalds doesn’t like. If Adobe wants something in the kernel that helps Flash but Linus thinks that does more harm than good, it’s not going in. Just as Linus is kernel hacking so that his users can hack at a higher level, at Apple they are taking responsibility for *all* of the tech so that their users can hack music, movies, books, Web pages, Web apps, documents, conversations, and so on at the level where they do their hacking.

    Finally, I think your comparisons of Apple and Microsoft are strained, like all comparisons of these 2 polar-opposite companies. You confused being forced to use Microsoft because they illegally monopolized a market to *feeling* forced to use Apple because they built by far the best product in a market. Apple did not kill HP Slate by cutting off its sales channels by saying to Best Buy “if you carry iPad, you can’t carry HP Slate”. HP Slate died its own legitimate death because iPad was so good it changed the market, it altered consumer’s perceptions of what a tablet should be. That caused HP to get into mobile chips and software, which improved competition in tablets, not reduced it. That is a functioning market. Microsoft even today makes all of their profits from their 2 illegally obtained monopolies. It is irrelevant to the discussion.

  11. Mike D. says:

    Fred: Yep, good points. I’m not sure Apple will never face antitrust scrutiny or levels of dominance that lead to it… I’m just saying the avoidance of it is definitely part of their strategy. It has to be these days for any company whose power has risen as high and as fast as Apple’s.

    James R. Grinter: Yep, I’m sure YouTube causes crashes from time to time… I was generalizing a bit. It’s usually much crazier stuff than what YouTube tries that tends to crash browsers. Many of these terrible Flash remnant ads you see on media sites commit all sorts of crimes like using ridiculously high frame rates, running endless script loops, communicating with other elements via buggy conduits, and more. My contention is that it’s poorly written Flash that generally causes problems, although the mere fact that that’s so possible and prevalent is a legitimate knock against Flash.

    river: Yes, I’m definitely doing the same thing as Apple and Adobe are doing… in order to illustrate why neither of their statements are precisely right. Each are calling the other “closed” while not acknowledging that they themselves are closed as well. I’m not saying either is wrong in their decision to be closed in the ways they have chosen to be. I’m just pointing it out. As for the rest of your comment, I think you’re right in that Apple cares intensely about great products and that is the driving force behind everything they do, but if Apple thinks these products are as great as you say, they have to also think they are going to dominate the market eventually… and when you dominate a market in technology these days (and stiffarm potential competitors), you enter a completely different zone than the zone Apples’ been operating in for their entire life as a company. I’m just saying they are wary of this and they quite intentionally will try to avoid it.

    bVs: Yep, the golden birdhouse analogy is interesting. Could prove prescient or irrelevant. We’ll have to wait and see.

    Croftie: Well said. Also, with regard to encoded video, best practices would include always keeping a high quality master, so re-encoding might be a pain, but it should be something that is doable for a company/person who planned well.

    jz: Loved your duet with Alicia Keys. Good points. The “arbiter of content” part was probably not adequately discussed in this article, because I agree, it’s the most concerning behavior we’ve already seen from Apple, as opposed to worrying about if it will happen eventually.

    Justin and Hamranhansenhansen: Spare me the strawmen please. Why don’t we just say that since I can sell a $5 plastic case for the iPhone without Apple’s approval, then that means Apple is open and any arguments to the contrary are false. I’m talking about the ability to be a first-class citizen on the iPhone here… not the ability to do anything under the sun that is loosely related to it.

  12. […] [Mike Industries] Categories: Commentary Tags: Apple, microsoft Comments (0) Trackbacks (0) Leave a comment Trackback […]

  13. […] A good problem to have | Mike Industries It’s scary to people because they remember the harm other companies have done when they reached monopoly status, but with Google, Microsoft, Nokia, RIMM, and now HP all keeping the market healthy with different alternatives, there is no excuse for not voting with your feet if you’re unhappy. Apple’s not going to take over the world because — if for no other reason — the laws of the United States won’t let them. If you don’t want to contribute to their success because their behavior is distasteful to you, then don’t; but don’t forget how fortunate we are to have such a ruthlessly innovative company at the helm of the ship at this point in time. Either get on it or just pick another boat and draft in its wake. When the biggest problem in personal technology is that the leading company is getting a little too exceptional, it’s a good problem to have. […]

  14. Don C says:

    Loved your article “Good problem to have” Could you explain to me how people like Mr. Thurrott miss the “ease of use” that you are generally guaranteed when using Apple products? The frustration of using bad software seems to be a non issue. It doesn’t bother them at all! They don’t even get it. When it takes 2 or 3 times as many steps to accomplish a simple task, how do you not notice? The shortest distance between two points should be straight line. That’s the Apple HYPE we all follow? I don’t understand how they can only see it as drinking the Apple juice.

  15. Matunos says:

    The day Apple locks down Macs as they do their iPhones/iPads is the day I go back to installing Linux on my laptop.

    I see iPhones/iP{a,o}ds differently from my general purpose computing. These are consumer devices. When I want to hunker down and do some work, I will use my laptop. If I just want to browse the web, watch some movies on the go, or read an e-book, it seems the iPad is a better option. If I want to make phone calls… well.. um… well the iPhone has a lot of neat features too. I would put the iPad more in the category of my XBox than my MacBook. I don’t see a lot of porn games getting licensed for the XBox.

    I think there’s more to Apple’s strategies than just maintaining strawmen to keep the antitrust lawyers away. Apple has resurrected itself by offering extremely well-designed products that present a completely coherent and consistent experience. To offer that, you have to maintain a certain level of control over the entire platform, especially on these consumer devices. This is what separates them in a market dominated by commodity hardware and software. Sure, you can find a Wintel laptop with better specs at a cheaper price… but it doesn’t offer the same OS X experience. Sure, you can get an Android, or a Blackberry, or a Palm or a WinMo… but they don’t offer the same experience as the iPhone. The latter 3 all predated the iPhone, but they’re being left in its dust. This is why we always hear about the next ‘iPod-killer’ instead of the Zune-killer. This is why Apple has just single-handedly created a consumer market for tablets where the PC one was dead. The market is speaking. This can’t all be chalked up to Steve Jobs’ reality distortion field, or the unquestioning loyalty of Apple fanboys. Regular people love Apples products, and there’s little that all the haters of the world can do about it.

    Would I like to see Apple be a little bit more allowing with their AppStore? I sure would. But as HTML5 matures, running native apps will be a little less important, and Flash a little less relevant.

    Oh, and I’ve been waiting for Flash to die since long before I became an Apple user. It has nothing to do with web ads for me, it has to do with a proprietary format dominating rich media on the web.

  16. […] May 5, 2010 · Leave a Comment It’s scary to people because they remember the harm other companies have done when they reached monopoly status, but with Google, Microsoft, Nokia, RIMM, and now HP all keeping the market healthy with different alternatives, there is no excuse for not voting with your feet if you’re unhappy. Apple’s not going to take over the world because — if for no other reason — the laws of the United States won’t let them. If you don’t want to contribute to their success because their behavior is distasteful to you, then don’t; but don’t forget how fortunate we are to have such a ruthlessly innovative company at the helm of the ship at this point in time. Either get on it or just pick another boat and draft in its wake. When the biggest problem in personal technology is that the leading company is via mikeindustries.com […]

  17. alex kent says:

    hi,

    you can print tiled documents in Photoshop CS5 from Bridge (included with Ps).
    use the Output panel in Bridge and tick the ‘Repeat One Photo per page’ checkbox.

    as an aside, the output panel is pretty horrible (i’ve personally complained my ass off about it through the CS4 and CS5 beta cycles), but it does do what you need.

    rest of the article is an interesting read, thank you.

    alex

  18. […] It went something like this: Other person: When are you going to give up already and start using a PC? The war is over. Apple lost. Me: They still make the best stuff and I want to support the company that makes the best stuff; not a company that uses their monopoly to sell products. Other person: Don't you think Apple would do thing? Me: Yes…Source:http://www.mikeindustries.com/blog/archive/2010/05/a-good-problem-to-have […]

  19. Notflash Gordon says:

    Watching a video on Youtube crashed my browser of choice two times today. So much for “Watching Flash video on YouTube doesn’t crash your browser”

  20. […] Finally we need to look at why Steve is pushing this issue so hard.  They want to displace flash as a dominant platform on the web.  I have seen a number of interesting post looking at very holistic reasons. This one is especially interesting but essentially wrong. “A good problem to have“. […]

  21. […] Original source : http://www.mikeindustries.com/blog/archive/2010/05… […]

  22. […] via A good problem to have | Mike Industries. […]

  23. […] A good problem to have | Mike Industries. A good problem to have | Mike Industries | Grab the Site RSS Feed Check out my latest project: […]

  24. Mystakill says:

    @Kyle Hayes:

    You can generally pick up both Pixelmator *and* Acorn for less than $100 if you catch them on sale or in a bundle. PS is overkill for my needs, but now I have two great alternatives to use instead (and, no, the GIMP is not an acceptable alternative).

  25. […] Davidson has written an excellent article regarding the whole Apple vs. Adobe stuff. Read the article for sure, but what I’m more interested in is the Quote of the Week […]

  26. Jason says:

    ROFL: “..that slowly sashayed that 300×250 div right the fuck over that paragraph you were trying to read…”

  27. […] A good problem to have (tags: article editorial technology apple history) […]

  28. Joe says:

    Great article. Thanks for sharing it.

    While you might think the points Hamranhansenhansen made are a strawman, I had the same thoughts. The inclusion of a full-featured Safari browser with every iPaod should not be discounted.

    The platforms that will really suffer are those that don’t include a modern and full-featured browser, regardless of what happens with Flash.

  29. […] Apple: Think similar Apple vs. the Web: The Case for Staying Out of Steve Jobs’s Walled Garden A Good Problem to Have […]

  30. […] Finally we need to look at why Steve is pushing this issue so hard.  They want to displace flash as a dominant platform on the web.  I have seen a number of interesting post looking at very holistic reasons. This one is especially interesting but essentially wrong. “A good problem to have“. […]

  31. Eric Silva says:

    @mykola

    “It complicates my life.”

    “I’m rolling with it, but it sucks. That’s all I’m saying.”

    These things may be true. You seem heavily invested in Flash. It might be time to diversify.

    The decision to exclude flash from iPhone OS may indeed suck for you, but it’s good for Apple. And mobile devices sans Flash are good enough for users, because they’re flocking to the iPhone and iPad.

    “But it doesn’t make it any less juvenile and frustrating. I’m just trying to make useful, interesting and beautiful things. Why does that make me a second-class citizen to Apple, whose products I love?”

    Apple would love you to make “interesting and beautiful” things. They just want you to do it with tools (Xcode) and/or technologies (HTML5, Javascript, Objective-C) over which they have influence – or complete control. That is actually good long-term thinking for Apple – they don’t want to have to rely on anyone else the way they did in the past (Metrowerks, IBM, Microsoft, etc.)

  32. […] The bearded wonder, Mike Davidson, made this point earlier in the week. […]

  33. […] – Mike Industries: A good problem to have […]

  34. […] A good problem to have | Mike Industries […]

  35. smick says:

    Apple like a country club. Interesting analogy. Only I know a lot of members of some nice country clubs with more sense than to incessantly talk about their club as so much better than everyone else’s and act like complete hipster douchebags in the face of criticism. Not saying that Mike Davidson is doing that, far from it, this article was quite good.

    Flash or Unity 3D or other plugins should be a choice of the device owner. And handled properly, made easy to turn on and off. Especially if said device is doing similar things (browsing the web) like other devices put out by the same company. If it’s gonna be slow or crash prone then make it easy for me to shut off. simple!

    Many or most Flash movies run well on Macbooks, Macbook Airs on different browsers. I actually can’t recall my Firefox really crashing at all with Flash. Probably it has, but not more than anything else. Very seldom. When Jobs says Flash causes Macs to crash? That’s a lie. Flash is NOT crashing entire computers, requiring a reboot. It MAY be the most REPORTED crash via the browser crash report, but Flash / Browser would also be the most used program too. Flash is overused on sites and the user doesn’t even know it, probably on their ESPN and news sites (I’ve never seen a news site with video properly implemented. It’s always shit.)

    Perhaps Flash should be allowed via an on/off switch, as Firefox can with an extension. But it won’t even be given that chance because Jobs knows all the great games and other special apps done in flash and Air will hurt his business. Why not tell the truth? I mean if he can do whatever he wants and people still buy, why not just say the f—ing truth then?

    He has been lying and/or telling the wrong story about Flash the whole time. He acts like Flash and video don’t go together when it’s been the major way video has worked over the past years. HTML5 shows up, what in the past few months on some of the most recent browsers and suddenly Flash is this horrible thing? I’m sorry, companies with investments in special playlist players, hyperlinked objects with ads and whatever need a little more proof that HTML5 can help them do everything the had been doing. Sure I hate ads, but the ads pay for the sites that show the videos. Tell them to do it without ads and see how long they want to pay for bandwidth.

    Who cares if Flash 10.X hasn’t been ready when they stated? iPad apps launching now weren’t ready for the device release. Why not allow the add-on later? Using Mike Davidson’s analogy, we could call Flash the taco stand that wants to set up at the country club in front of the elegant lunch buffet. The gaudy taco stand that would eat into the sales of the restaurant. BUT if the members either didn’t care about the taco stand or WANTED tacos once in a while, maybe the club MEMBERS should make that decision even if when the taco stand was in operation it might affect their battery life.

    My experience with Adobe for years. Sometimes slow, such as Bridge and Photoshop. I hate the way Illustrator works, but I have NEVER had Photoshop crash on Mac or PC. Only a couple times Premiere crashed and it appeared to be an install issue with an earlier version. As much as I want other programs to compete better, few do. Xara for Windows kicks ass, but Gimp, Inkscape, Scribus, Corel? Not doing it for me so much. Adobe is expensive. I think their pricing should be maybe 900 for the entire Master Collection and down from there, but the market still buys it.

    My main problems with Apple. My little nephew can’t take a programming class and make an iPhone game and let me try it on my iPhone while in progress. He can’t share his stuff that way, so he’s supposed to learn these superior lean programming methods HOW??

    Oh with only 10 times as many hoops to jump through at age 13. And the companies I work for can’t make on cross-platform app (like flash enables) with animation or certain features that will work on all devices. Yes FLASH does do things other web technologies can’t do. (some without requiring a lot of programming knowledge or compiling). From the perspective of many, FLASH JUST WORKS. Again I know the arguments, but I can beat all of them because well-done flash proggys are everywhere. That’s why it exists. It enables certain things that in fact just WON’T be there. You think it takes a long time for a new Flash player! We are just seeing partially completed HTML5 specs partially implemented. When were standards boards ever known for speed??

    This whole scene about Apple has opened up a big bitch session about Adobe, people saying, good riddance to Flash. It’s 99% hot air, people not knowing what they’re talking about. They narrow the discussion excluding the important things of Flash and cross platform development. Many are ignorant of the swf file format as well. And they take the comments of Scribd and Opera as reasons Flash shouldn’t be there. Hello, it’s worked well for a while now, so has Youtube. They can do what they want that way, but Flash has given the ability to make a completely cross platform identical look even down to font embedding. Now the CSS3 font stuff is sort of happening in 2010. Color me impressed! Can’t wait to pay those fees to use fonts on my sites, when a great number of people still can’t see them.

    See I’m the person who thinks Apple designs are just kinda good. The winning designs for me, the ones that really kill it are the magic mouse (might mouse sucked balls) and the big apple touchpad. I hear the airport is a great router too. Other than that, I’d rather have a different companies product, and I’d save money in most cases doing that.

  36. […] […]

  37. […] I don’t know how much truth there is in these analyses, but this article, A good problem to have by Mike Davidson is a great read. It is this prescient and necessarily restrained motivation that […]

  38. […] that does not maximize their profits for the sake of the ecosystem?  That seems doubtful, though there might be exceptions to the rule.  While those doomsayers may be slightly overstating their case right now, when we even begin to […]

  39. Travis Butler says:

    @ mykola: I’m sorry, and I’m trying not to be ‘juvenile’ about it. But I see developers like you as being as much of the problem as Adobe, quite frankly.

    You ask if I’ve never visited a site on my iPhone where there was Flash content I’ve wanted to view? There have been a few cases where I’ve visited a site where the content was locked away in Flash. But my reaction is never “I wish I had Flash so I could view this” – it’s *always* “I wish the developer would put this in standards-based HTML so I could view this.”

    Because I’ve never liked Flash as a web development tool, and this goes back to when it first started showing up in the late 90’s. Bugs and poor performance are part of it, but only a part. Just as important, if not more so, are the ways Flash-based design fundamentally breaks web navigation.

    If I see an item on a Flash-designed website that I want to point out, I can’t link directly to it; I have to use a ridiculously roundabout description, like “visit this URL, click button [Y], scroll through the resulting list, pick the 15th item, click OK, then look at the picture four rows down in the fifth column.” By the same token, I can’t bookmark a section of interest; I can only bookmark a homepage, then be forced to navigate back each and every time. (This was a real hassle when I worked at a wholesale distributor and had to maintain their specimen label and MSDS collection; one of our major suppliers had a Flash-based homepage that prevented me from linking directly to their label/MSDS page.) Flash navigation breaks the browser’s history cache – both for navigating and for searching. And to quote the often-used reducto ad absurdum, you can’t even use the Back button on a Flash-based website. Where you claim “useful, interesting and beautiful things,” far more often I see ‘developers more in love with their own elaborate stylistic vision than with making things simply accessible to users.’

    (Not to mention the problem of non-standard controls mentioned previously in the thread. Using non-standard controls, like custom scroll bars, means that things like mouse scroll wheels aren’t guaranteed to work – and if new behaviors/control methods are developed, Flash-based apps don’t get them for free when the browser is updated, but must wait until they’re implemented in Flash proper – or worse, have to be implemented by the developer in numerous inconsistent ways. Using native HTML elements, these things Just Work, and I’ve lost track of the number of Flash apps that use their own crappy control system. The screen reader issue is a perfect example of this; if you design your site well in standard HTML, screen reader support isn’t something you have to *add*, you get it for free. And the same will be true for anything new coming down the pike.)

    So yes, I’m cheering on the move to standard HTML5 and away from Flash. Because in the end, the users are more important than the developers.

  40. […] Most of the bitching comes from people who, for whatever reason, think Apple’s lead in the marketplace obligates them to allow their competitors a handicap. Frankly, I think that is ludicrous. I want to see competition, and companies aren’t pressed to compete when they are given an unfair advantage just for being behind. If nothing else, Apple’s rise to dominance should be a clear sign that consumers are willing to pay for quality. As Mike Davidson said regarding Apple at the helm, this is a good problem to have. […]

  41. […] Most of the bitching comes from people who, for whatever reason, think Apple’s lead in the marketplace obligates them to allow their competitors a handicap. Frankly, I think that is ludicrous. I want to see competition, and companies aren’t pressed to compete when they are given an unfair advantage just for being behind. If nothing else, Apple’s rise to dominance should be a clear sign that consumers are willing to pay for quality. As Mike Davidson said regarding Apple at the helm, this is a good problem to have. […]

  42. […] facto monopoly through the App Store. That’s the grim version.  Newsvine CEO Mike Davidson offered a different take earlier this year on the ultimate goals of Apple’s app store.  He was talking about the […]

  43. […] Most of the bitching comes from people who, for whatever reason, think Apple’s lead in the marketplace obligates them to allow their competitors a handicap. Frankly, I think that is ludicrous. I want to see competition, and companies aren’t pressed to compete when they are given an unfair advantage just for being behind. If nothing else, Apple’s rise to dominance should be a clear sign that consumers are willing to pay for quality. As Mike Davidson said regarding Apple at the helm, this is a good problem to have. […]

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The Ocean in 185 Lines of Javascript:

Mesmerizing. Try tweaking some of the variables in the “sea” section of the code.

“"Design had been a vertical stripe in the chain of events in a product’s delivery; at Apple, it became a long horizontal stripe, where design is part of every conversation.””
Why I Just Asked My Students To Put Their Laptops Away:

A great essay about how toxic everyday distractions can be.

Humanity's deep future:

A group of researchers at the Future of Humanity Institute talk about where our race may be going and how artificial intelligence could save or kill us all.

Steve Jobs speaks about the future at the International Design Conference in 1983:

31 years later, it’s safe to say this is one of the most prescient speeches about technology ever delivered. Jobs covers wireless networking, tablets, Google StreetView, Siri, and the App Store (among other things) many years before their proliferation. A fantastic listen.

How to travel around the world for a year:

Great advice for when you finally find the time.

LiveSurface:

A fantastic app for prototyping your design work onto real world objects like billboards, book covers, and coffee cups. This seems like just as great of a tool for people learning design as it does for experts.

50 problems in 50 days:

One man’s attempt to solve 50 problems in 50 days using only great design. Some good startup ideas in here…

How to Do Philosophy:

If you’ve ever suspected that most classical philosophy is a colossal waste of time, Paul Graham tells you why you’re probably right.

TIME: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us:

Stephen Brill follows the money to uncover the pinnacle of corruption that is the U.S. Health Care system. A must-read article if there ever was one.

DIY Dot Org:

A beautifully designed site full of fun and challenging DIY projects. I could spend months on here.

The Steve Jobs Video Archive:

A collection of over 250 Steve Jobs videos in biographical order

Self-portraits from an artist under the influence of 48 different psychoactive drug combos.

Water Wigs are pretty amazing.

David Pogue proposes to his girlfriend by creating a fake movie trailer about them and then getting a theater to play it before a real movie. Beautiful and totally awesome.